UAVs take flight for exploration

uavs-take-flight-for-exploration
Salem Al Shammari, EXPEC ARC Geology Technology/UAV project lead, center, and his team conduct a field test of a UAV.

The search for oil and gas requires geologists and explorationists to conduct studies on outcrops of rock layers that hold hydrocarbon. Understanding the characteristics of such layers is essential in assessing their potential to hold and produce oil and gas.

There are many difficulties that explorationists face in the field. Accessing steep, rocky outcrops in remote sections of the desert to analyze and chart the structure in pursuit of new hydrocarbon deposits is challenging and physically takes time. The formations are also often hazardous to access or climb.

To eliminate such difficulties and reduce man-hours spent in the field, Geology Technology (GTT) researchers at the EXPEC Advanced Research Center (EXPEC ARC) have been developing a new concept and are now sending unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to conduct “virtual geological field trips” easily gliding over and more accurately documenting challenging geological features and terrain. Bringing a “virtual” outcrop to the office and working with it on a computer screen is a dream come true.   

The search for oil and gas requires geologists and explorationists to conduct studies on outcrops of rock layers that hold hydrocarbon. Understanding the characteristics of such layers is essential in assessing their potential to hold and produce oil and gas.

There are many difficulties that explorationists face in the field. Accessing steep, rocky outcrops in remote sections of the desert to analyze and chart the structure in pursuit of new hydrocarbon deposits is challenging and physically takes time. The formations are also often hazardous to access or climb.

To eliminate such difficulties and reduce man-hours spent in the field, Geology Technology (GTT) researchers at the EXPEC Advanced Research Center (EXPEC ARC) have been developing a new concept and are now sending unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to conduct “virtual geological field trips” easily gliding over and more accurately documenting challenging geological features and terrain. Bringing a “virtual” outcrop to the office and working with it on a computer screen is a dream come true.   

The search for oil and gas requires geologists and explorationists to conduct studies on outcrops of rock layers that hold hydrocarbon. Understanding the characteristics of such layers is essential in assessing their potential to hold and produce oil and gas.

There are many difficulties that explorationists face in the field. Accessing steep, rocky outcrops in remote sections of the desert to analyze and chart the structure in pursuit of new hydrocarbon deposits is challenging and physically takes time. The formations are also often hazardous to access or climb.

To eliminate such difficulties and reduce man-hours spent in the field, Geology Technology (GTT) researchers at the EXPEC Advanced Research Center (EXPEC ARC) have been developing a new concept and are now sending unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to conduct “virtual geological field trips” easily gliding over and more accurately documenting challenging geological features and terrain. Bringing a “virtual” outcrop to the office and working with it on a computer screen is a dream come true.   

The search for oil and gas requires geologists and explorationists to conduct studies on outcrops of rock layers that hold hydrocarbon. Understanding the characteristics of such layers is essential in assessing their potential to hold and produce oil and gas.

There are many difficulties that explorationists face in the field. Accessing steep, rocky outcrops in remote sections of the desert to analyze and chart the structure in pursuit of new hydrocarbon deposits is challenging and physically takes time. The formations are also often hazardous to access or climb.

To eliminate such difficulties and reduce man-hours spent in the field, Geology Technology (GTT) researchers at the EXPEC Advanced Research Center (EXPEC ARC) have been developing a new concept and are now sending unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to conduct “virtual geological field trips” easily gliding over and more accurately documenting challenging geological features and terrain. Bringing a “virtual” outcrop to the office and working with it on a computer screen is a dream come true.